Wednesday, May 1, 2013

industrial shelves

Have I mentioned yet that our beach bungalow is 600 square feet? It makes me chuckle when I tell people that because they usually respond with, "Oh." As in "oh, how sad". And I get it, it is small. Smaller than small. Especially for California. Triple digit square footage is not common around these parts. To give you an idea of how small it is, if you shower with the bathroom door open, EVERY window in our place fogs up. THAT'S how small it is. But I love it. It's our perfect, cozy, little love nest.

The lack of space makes designing a challenge, no doubt. But, I have really enjoyed it. One problem we came across is that there is only one solid wall in the living room where you can place a television. The other walls either have a window, sliding glass door, or is a half wall to our kitchen. But, the remaining wall has a wall heater akwardly semi-centered on it. (please excuse the mess, it was move in day.)


I racked my brain to figure out how to solve this problem. One day, I came across this picture on Pinterest



We decided to tweak the above picture in two ways to fit our wall. 1) We notched out the wood so it could fit around the ugly wall heater. 2) We figured we could save on supplies/money by not installing the back verticle pipe pieces. The industrial black pipe is so sturdy that we knew that the horizontal pieces would be able to support the wood shelves.

I drew a diagram so we could know what size pieces we would need. This drawing was a good jumping off point, but we ultimately changed a few aspects in the end.



So off to Lowes we went to collect the supplies. 




The next steps require assembling the pipes, t's and flanges. (sorry no pictures)

Since we wanted a natural looking wood, we decided to use premium grade 2" x 12" redwood (which when they say 12" at the hardware store, it is usually shy a 1/2" so it fit perfectly on our 12" horizontal black pipe shelf support). 

A BIG word to the wise: you're definitely better off making your shelving unit work with the size pipe that they sell at Lowes/Home Depot/ Whatever-store you go to. Black industrial pipe is sold in basic sizes; 8", 10" 12", 18" as well as very long pieces that can be cut to any size you choose. I tried to get tricky and had them cut long pieces of pipe into different sizes and it ended up being a little bit of a headache. I had to go back to Lowes 3 different times to have pipe re-cut to fit our plan. Let me just say, that when I'm approaching that time of the month, you do not want to find me at Lowes for the 3rd time on Sunday after a weekend of DIY-ing. I probably resemble some sort of flared nostrel troll/fire-breathing dragon combination. I'll save you guys the time and not explain the whole "3rd Lowes trip in one day" incident and just tell you that my conversation with Mr. Lowes Congeniality ended with him saying,

"You do that, Lady."

"Lady." It still rings in my head. I officially became the crazy lady at Lowes. Sorry, I'm not sorry. Sometimes a girl's gotta do what a girl's gotta do to get a project done. I was not going to leave Lowes without my pipe cut. I think my Mom would be proud. 

And here it is. Don't mind the blank space. That's were a T.V. will eventually go. Please don't be alarmed that we don't have a television (yet?). We'll get there. I think it's obvious where my priorities are. I would much rather have some thrifted chairs recovered than a T.V. 








One last look at before


and after!




18 comments:

  1. Wow and I thought I was handy! You're amazing!

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    1. Thanks Julie! I couldn't do it all by myself - my hubs helps alot!

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  2. so fantastic! my hubby and i were JUST trying to sort out how to build something like this! you have given my the final incentive to get going! would you mind sharing a ballpark of the cost for the pipes?

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    1. I'm so glad that you are going to give it a go! The cost of the whole project was around $200, but that was because we decided to use premium grade wood for the shelves themselves, which wouldn't be necessary if you are trying to keep the cost down. It's crucial to have a draw out plan of your shelving before you head to the hardware store so you know how many of each piece to get. Also, I used 10" black pipe as the horizontal support for the wood shelves to sit on and capped it with an elbow (as you can see in the side view picture above). Please email me if you have any other questions at caseymariemason@outlook.com. Happy DIY-ing!

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    2. Correction: I used 12" black pipe as the horizontal support for the wood shelves

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  3. I love your shelves! Definitely a good way to work with a problem heater!
    I made similar shelves, and posted them here: http://sylvieliv.blogspot.com/2012/05/industrial-rustic-shelf-tutorial.html

    P.S. That big lantern on the floor is awesome!! :)
    Sylvie

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    1. Hi Sylvie!

      Thanks for checking out my post! I love your shelves as well! You did a really good job at documenting the process with pictures. Great blog by the way!

      I got the lantern at an antique shop and I am constantly on the look out for more :)

      Take care!
      Casey

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  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  5. great job of hiding the panel, I actually didn't notice it when I scrolled down and looked at the pictures in reverse order. The industrial shelving shelving works excellently

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  6. I've had this shelf pinned for a while (glad I found your site- I love it!) and I finally have time to tackle a project like this for our basement. Quick question: did you attach the horizontal pipes to the wall on the bottom shelves? I don't think I see a flange for those pipes, but wondering if you secured these some other way. Thanks!

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    1. Hi Heather!

      Thanks for stopping by! The horizontal pipes are not attached to the wall. The only place where the shelving unit is attached to the wall is at the top, where the pipe elbows and the flange meets the wall. The shelves are held in place by an upturned elbow at the end of each horizontal pipe. This creates a lip that keeps the shelf in place. If you would like to give me your email I can send you some better photos of the unit so you can understand what I am talking about. Sorry! It's a little hard to explain through words. The shelves themselves are very sturdy, that being said, since it is only attached to the wall at the top, I wouldn't recommend this for an area where you have kids/dogs/lots of activity/many opportunities to knock a leg out from under the unit. But, I'm sure they is a way to attach it to the wall more securely. Hope this helps? Good luck!

      Casey

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  7. LOVE this! Do you think you could do a row along the back to make it freestanding/not requiring screwing in? Also, do you just screw it to the wall or do you need to screw it into a stud? (boy that sounds unintentionally dirty...)

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    1. Thanks Jamie!

      Hmmm... I'm not sure if that is possible or not. I think the way the elbows are layed out wouldn't allow for that. And we just screwed it into the wall, no stud screwing needed ;) (hehe). But, bear in mind that we don't have kids or dogs, so there really isn't any chance of it getting bumped into. If you have a lot of activity in your home, you might want to consider screwing it into a stud.

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  8. Hi Casey,

    I love this project! Do you think you could send me the pictures of how you have the elbows upturned against the wall and any other helpful images? My email is rerin2run@hotmail.com

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  9. Hi Casey,

    You didn't screw the flanges into the tile did you? They just rest on there? I'm trying to sort out building something like this on carpet but I want to make sure I don't need to screw it into the floor.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by!

      No the flanges are not screwed to the tile. The only place where that shelving unit is screwed in is at the top of the unit where it meets the wall. The shelves themselves are very sturdy, that being said, since it is only attached to the wall at the top, I wouldn't recommend this for an area where you have kids/dogs/lots of activity/many opportunities to knock a leg out from under the unit. I think carpet would create enough traction to keep the legs of the unit in place. We haven't had any problems with ours in the past year that we've had it installed.

      Good luck!

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    2. Thank you! That was very helpful. I'm gonna need it. ;)

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  10. How much did all of those pieces cost!! I love it!

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