Friday, April 12, 2013

our wedding: part 3


And, just a heads up, there will be a part 4. 

The Veil. I knew from the beginning that I wanted a cathedral length veil with lace edging. Pinned these photos in the very beginning of the planning process and fell immediately in love.




So, when I went to try on dresses, I tried on a catherdral length veil and almost had a heart attack when they told me how much it cost. $1,800.00! What the dust. Seriously, it’s tulle and lace. Oh, I was not going to fall sucker to that. Oh no, gurl. I knew that I had to make my own. Here we go with yet another DIY project that I assumed would be quick and easy until I actually started it.

First, to buy the materials. I knew that I wanted the lace to match the lace at the bottom of my dress (I have a weird thing about mis-matched lace. Chalk it up to being a product of the 80’s/early 90’s when my mom would sew lace trims on the bottom of my acid washed denim skirts and shorts). After a little research, I realized that the lace on my dress is called Alencon. A special note to future brides: this might happen to you and I’m sorry but I don’t think there is any way around it. There is a strong to quite strong possibility that you might become an expert in lace. I did. I have all of this usless knowledge about lace: it’s origin, pricing, honestly, you could blindfold me and I could tell you the type of lace just through touch. Call me the lace whisperer. I know, you’re jealous. I found imitation Alencon lace online for $30/yard. The real stuff runs about $100/yard.  Bonus: you can’t tell the difference, at least not with the lace that I found. I figured that I needed about 7 yards. My mom and I picked up the tulle downtown for $20.00. We actually found a bridal shop downtown that sells plain tulle cathedral veils which was perfect because we didn’t have to cut or alter any tulle. All I had to do was stich on the lace. Easy enough right? Shut it. 17 hours later (No, I’m not kidding. Yes, I counted. No, I didn't do it all in one sitting) I had hand stitched on all the lace and my veil was complete. Hand stiched meaning my hand and a needle, not my hand guiding tulle threw a sewing machine, there's a BIG difference. Now I know why it cost $1,800.00 at the first bridal salon. Money can’t buy happiness, but it can buy back 17 hours of your life spent crouched over your parents kitchen island for hours on end. Cest la vie. I say things like that to be funny, but the honest truth is that it felt really awesome to save the money and to tell people that I made my own veil. And, my sister is going to wear it for her wedding this summer and I hope that my daughter will want to wear it one day and that her daughter will want to wear it also. 





Michael Radford Photography

Michael Radford Photography


Now, on to one of my favorite projects that I completed. The signs. I did all the letering by hand and found it very theraputic and enjoyable during all the craziness that was going on. My Mom and I were constantly on the look out for frames at garage sales and Goodwill. All we were concerned with was the shape/profile of the frame. We new that we could always paint over any ugly color or finish. Which is what we did on 90% of the frames. After the wedding I had friends ask about my signs, so I decided to open an Esty shop to sell custom chalkboard signs. You can check out my shop at http://www.etsy.com/shop/thegraybungalow

my Mom constructed this frame for our bar sign out of old wood and we stained it dark


Michael Radford Photography




Michael Radford Photography

Michael Radford Photography

Michael Radford Photography










Michael Radford Photography

Michael Radford Photography


Michael Radford Photography


Michael Radford Photography

Michael Radford Photography

I came home one day after work to find that my Mom and Aunt whipped together an awesome table top to sit on top of two old wine barrels that my Mom had found. Seriously, how amazing are they? 



The wine barrel table served double duty on the wedding day. We first used it during dinner for all the toppings for our taco bar.

Michael Radford Photography

We then used it as our dessert bar. And can I just add that all of our dessets were made by either my Mom, Aunt Mary, or our friend Katie

Michael Radford Photography

Katie made our delicious cake and I was just so in love with it. And my boss let me borrow her beautiful silver tray.

Michael Radford Photography


We had a family/friends work day and everyone came over and helped us with some projects. One of the biggest projects was putting up 16' lumber pieces around the reception site so we could string lights over the tables and dance floor. First we stained the lumber dark. 



Then, My dad used his tractor to dig the 3' deep holes. (sorry no pic)

Then the boys (mainly Cole, my sister's fiance, and his brothers and Dad) put the lumber in the holes and used a tamper to pack the dirt around them. It's pretty amazing to know that the poles are held up only by tightly packed dirt. No concerete was used. 








I really tried to wrap it up in part 3, but there is just so many things to cover ;)

and there just a little bit more in part 4...






7 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thanks Julie! It was definitely worth all the hard work!

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  3. honey pie. I love you and your blog!

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  4. Hi Casey! It's Amy's friend Michelle! I love this! So happy I found your blog! Your wedding looks amazing. LOVE all the DIY projects. I had to split my wedding into 4 parts on my blog as well.! :)

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    1. Thank you Michelle! I was just checking out your blog also... WOW! Amazing job with everything! I love your recipies and your pictures are very professional. I really gotta step up my game in that department! Thanks again for checking it out!

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